Multimodal Cross-registration and Quantification of Metric Distortions in Marmoset Whole Brain Histology using Diffeomorphic Mappings.

Lee, B.C., Lin, M.K., Fu, Y., Hata, J., Miller, M.I., Mitra, P. P. (May 2020) Multimodal Cross-registration and Quantification of Metric Distortions in Marmoset Whole Brain Histology using Diffeomorphic Mappings. J Comp Neurol. ISSN 0021-9967

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32406083
DOI: 10.1002/cne.24946

Abstract

Whole brain neuroanatomy using tera-voxel light-microscopic data sets is of much current interest. A fundamental problem in this field is the mapping of individual brain datasets to a reference space. Previous work has not rigorously quantified in-vivo to ex-vivo distortions in brain geometry from tissue processing. Further, existing approaches focus on registering uni-modal volumetric data; however, given the increasing interest in the marmoset model for neuroscience research and the importance of addressing individual brain architecture variations, new algorithms are necessary to cross-register multimodal datasets including MRIs and multiple histological series. Here we present a computational approach for same-subject multimodal MRI-guided reconstruction of a series of consecutive histological sections, jointly with diffeomorphic mapping to a reference atlas. We quantify the scale change during different stages of brain histological processing using the Jacobian determinant of the diffeomorphic transformations involved. By mapping the final image stacks to the ex-vivo post-fixation MRI, we show that a) tape-transfer assisted histological sections can be re-assembled accurately into 3D volumes with a local scale change of 2.0 ± 0.4% per axis dimension; in contrast, b) tissue perfusion/fixation as assessed by mapping the in-vivo MRIs to the ex-vivo post fixation MRIs shows a larger median absolute scale change of 6.9 ± 2.1% per axis dimension. This is the first systematic quantification of local metric distortions associated with whole-brain histological processing, and we expect that the results will generalize to other species. These local scale changes will be important for computing local properties to create reference brain maps.

Item Type: Paper
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL labs > Mitra lab
Depositing User: Adrian Gomez
Date: 14 May 2020
Date Deposited: 18 May 2020 16:29
Last Modified: 18 May 2020 16:29
Related URLs:
URI: https://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/39468

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