The Gesell schedules applied to one, two-, and three-year-old negro children of Jamaica, B. W. I.

Curti, Margaret Wooster, Marshall, Frances Botkin, Steggerda, Morris (October 1935) The Gesell schedules applied to one, two-, and three-year-old negro children of Jamaica, B. W. I. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 20 (2). pp. 125-156.

URL: http://psycnet.apa.org/journals/com/20/2/125/
DOI: 10.1037/h0057036

Abstract

The average performance of these negro children was inferior to that of the New Haven children on whom the tests were standardized. A number of factors are mentioned which show that this does not constitute reliable evidence of comparative inferiority. The validity of certain test items is questioned because the performance of Jamaica children on these items was irregular and inconsistent. Inferiority of height and weight was evidenced. The children tested were ahead of the Gesell norms in age of creeping, standing and walking. These children were markedly inferior in a number of personal-social items, but superior in such activities as running errands. In certain items regarded as good tests of intelligence, e.g., understanding and use of language, the negro children were approximately as able as the New Haven whites. It is suggested that the Jamaica children would have done better on the test as a whole had it been devised to be fair to both groups.

Item Type: Paper
Subjects: history > eugenics
CSHL Authors:
Communities: The Carnegie Institution Department of Genetics
Depositing User: Elizabeth Pessala
Date: October 1935
Date Deposited: 14 Jun 2017 19:54
Last Modified: 14 Jun 2017 19:54
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/34948

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