Binocular disparity can explain the orientation of ocular dominance stripes in primate primary visual area (V1)

Chklovskii, D. B. (2000) Binocular disparity can explain the orientation of ocular dominance stripes in primate primary visual area (V1). Vision Research, 40 (13). pp. 1765-1773. ISSN 0042-6989

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10814761
DOI: 10.1016/S0042-6989(00)00023-7

Abstract

In the primate primary visual area (VI), the ocular dominance pattern consists of alternating monocular stripes. Stripe orientation follows systematic trends preserved across several species. I propose that these trends result from minimizing the length of intra-cortical wiring needed to recombine information from the two eyes in order to achieve the perception of depth. I argue that the stripe orientation at any point of V1 should follow the direction of binocular disparity in the corresponding point of the visual field. The optimal pattern of stripes determined from this argument agrees with the ocular dominance pattern of macaque and Cebus monkeys. This theory predicts that for any point in the visual field the limits of depth perception are greatest in the direction along the ocular dominance stripes at that point.

Item Type: Paper
Uncontrolled Keywords: striate cortex ocular dominance pattern stereopsis binocular disparity panum's area MACAQUE STRIATE CORTEX MAGNIFICATION FACTOR CORTICAL MAPS MONKEY FIELD ORGANIZATION COLUMNS PATTERN OPTIMIZATION VARIABILITY
Subjects: organism description > animal behavior > visual
organs, tissues, organelles, cell types and functions > tissues types and functions > visual cortex
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL labs > Chklovskii lab
Depositing User: Matt Covey
Date: 2000
Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2014 16:24
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2014 16:24
Related URLs:
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/29357

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