Are obese plant genomes on a diet?

Rabinowicz, P. D. (July 2000) Are obese plant genomes on a diet? Genome Research, 10 (7). pp. 893-894. ISSN 1088-9051

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URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10899137
DOI: 10.1101/gr.10.7.893

Abstract

Richard Dawkins' (1976) selfish DNA hypothesis (that the only purpose of DNA is to perpetuate itself) is clearly reflected in the case of repetitive DNA, especially retrotransposons. These ubiquitous, self-replicating DNA elements do not seem to do anything but invade the host's genome (Orgel and Crick 1980; Doolittle and Sapienza 1980). Mutations caused by the activity of retrotransposons may eventually be evolutionarily advantageous, but are more likely to be deleterious for the host organism and thus eliminated from the population (Charlesworth et al. 1994). However, insertions of those elements that do not alter any functional region of the genome may be perpetuated in the population.

Item Type: Paper
Uncontrolled Keywords: DNA EVOLUTION GENES MAIZE
Subjects: bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > genomes
organism description > plant
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > DNA, RNA structure, function, modification > DNA expression > transposable elements
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > DNA, RNA structure, function, modification > transposons
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL labs > Martienssen lab
Depositing User: Matt Covey
Date: July 2000
Date Deposited: 31 Jan 2014 20:43
Last Modified: 31 Jan 2014 20:44
Related URLs:
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/29354

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