Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector

Nene, V., Wortman, J. R., Lawson, D., Haas, B., Kodira, C., Tu, Z., Loftus, B., Xi, Z., Megy, K., Grabherr, M., Ren, Q., Zdobnov, E. M., Lobo, N. F., Campbell, K. S., Brown, S. E., Bonaldo, M. F., Zhu, J., Sinkins, S. P., Hogenkamp, D. G., Amedeo, P., Arensburger, P., Atkinson, P. W., Bidwell, S., Biedler, J., Birney, E., Bruggner, R. V., Costas, J., Coy, M. R., Crabtree, J., Crawford, M., DeBruyn, B., DeCaprio, D., Eiglmeier, K., Eisenstadt, E., El-Dorry, H., Gelbart, W. M., Gomes, S. L., Hammond, M., Hannick, L. I., Hogan, J. R., Holmes, M. H., Jaffe, D., Johnston, J. S., Kennedy, R. C., Koo, H., Kravitz, S., Kriventseva, E. V., Kulp, D., LaButti, K., Lee, E., Li, S., Lovin, D. D., Mao, C., Mauceli, E., Menck, C. F. M., Miller, J. R., Montgomery, P., Mori, A., Nascimento, A. L., Naveira, H. F., Nusbaum, C., O'Leary, S., Orvis, J., Pertea, M., Quesneville, H., Reidenbach, K. R., Rogers, Y. H., Roth, C. W., Schneider, J. R., Schatz, M., Shumway, M., Stanke, M., Stinson, E. O., Tubio, J. M. C., VanZee, J. P., Verjovski-Almeida, S., Werner, D., White, O., Wyder, S., Zeng, Q., Zhao, Q., Zhao, Y., Hill, C. A., Raikhel, A. S., Soares, M. B., Knudson, D. L., Lee, N. H., Galagan, J., Salzberg, S. L., Paulsen, I. T., Dimopoulos, G., Collins, F. H., Birren, B., Fraser-Liggett, C. M., Severson, D. W. (2007) Genome sequence of Aedes aegypti, a major arbovirus vector. Science, 316 (5832). pp. 1718-1723. ISSN 00368075 (ISSN)

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17510324
DOI: 10.1126/science.1138878

Abstract

We present a draft sequence of the genome of Aedes aegypti, the primary vector for yellow fever and dengue fever, which at ∼1376 million base pairs is about 5 times the size of the genome of the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae. Nearly 50% of the Ae. aegypti genome consists of transposable elements. These contribute to a factor of ∼4 to 6 increase in average gene length and in sizes of intergenic regions relative to An. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster. Nonetheless, chromosomal synteny is generally maintained among all three insects, although conservation of orthologous gene order is higher (by a factor of ∼2) between the mosquito species than between either of them and the fruit fly. An increase in genes encoding odorant binding, cytochrome P450, and cuticle domains relative to An. gambiae suggests that members of these protein families underpin some of the biological differences between the two mosquito species.

Item Type: Paper
Uncontrolled Keywords: arbovirus vector cytochrome P450 spacer DNA unclassified drug virus vector disease vector genetic analysis genome mosquito virus Aedes aegypti Anopheles gambiae article dengue Drosophila melanogaster gene order gene sequence gene structure genetic conservation genetic transcription genome analysis multigene family nonhuman priority journal sequence analysis synteny yellow fever Aedes Animals Arboviruses Base Sequence DNA Transposable Elements Female Genes, Insect Genome, Insect Humans Insect Proteins Insect Vectors Male Membrane Transport Proteins Molecular Sequence Data Protein Structure, Tertiary Sequence Analysis, DNA Sex Characteristics Sex Determination (Genetics) Species Specificity Transcription, Genetic Arbovirus Hexapoda
Subjects: bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > alignment
bioinformatics
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > Mapping and Rendering
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > alignment > sequence alignment
organism description > animal
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > genomes
organism description > animal > insect
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL labs > Schatz lab
Depositing User: Matt Covey
Date: 2007
Date Deposited: 15 Mar 2013 16:56
Last Modified: 15 Mar 2013 16:56
PMCID: PMC2868357
Related URLs:
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/27831

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