A non-cell-autonomous mechanism for the control of plant architecture and epidermal differentiation involves intercellular trafficking of BREVIPEDICELLUS protein

Rim, Y., Jung, J. H., Chu, H., Cho, W. K., Kim, S. W., Hong, J. C., Jackson, D. P., Datla, R., Kim, J. Y. (March 2009) A non-cell-autonomous mechanism for the control of plant architecture and epidermal differentiation involves intercellular trafficking of BREVIPEDICELLUS protein. Functional Plant Biology, 36 (3). pp. 280-289. ISSN 1445-4408

URL: http://www.publish.csiro.au/paper/FP08243.htm
DOI: 10.1071/FP08243

Abstract

Intercellular trafficking of maize KNOTTED1 and its homologous KNOTTED1-related homeobox (KNOX) proteins has been reported; however, little is known about the functional significance of KNOX trafficking in plant development. In this study, we showed that intercellular movement of BREVIPEDICELLUS (BP or KNAT1), the closest Arabidopsis homologue of KNOTTED1, is tissue-specific and takes place through a selective pathway. When BP was fused to a red fluorescent mCherry construct, it could move from the mesophyll to epidermal cells of leaves, although it could not move out from the cortex/endodermis of roots. Using a trichome rescue-trafficking assay, we also showed that BP fusion could confer gain-of-trafficking function to the cell-autonomous GLABROUS1 (GL1) protein. In the wild type, BP transcripts are expressed in the sub-epidermal cortical cell layers of the inflorescence stem and pedicel. However, bp mutant phenotypes include defects in epidermal cell differentiation suggesting a non-cell-autonomous function. Expression of a GFP:BP fusion under the control of a BP promoter specific to the stem cortex layers resulted in epidermal GFP fluorescence suggesting its movement from subepidermis to epidermis. Here, we provide evidence from complementation analyses using cell autonomous or non-cell-autonomous BP fusions that the intercellular trafficking of BP protein is important for plant architecture and epidermal differentiation.

Item Type: Paper
Subjects: bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > protein structure, function, modification > protein types > knotted1
bioinformatics > genomics and proteomics > genetics & nucleic acid processing > DNA, RNA structure, function, modification > genes, structure and function > genes: types > knotted1
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL labs > Jackson lab
Depositing User: CSHL Librarian
Date: 2 March 2009
Date Deposited: 03 Apr 2012 17:51
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2015 13:56
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/25940

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