A Beta Oscillation Network in the Rat Olfactory System During a 2-Alternative Choice Odor Discrimination Task

Kay, L. M., Beshel, J. (2010) A Beta Oscillation Network in the Rat Olfactory System During a 2-Alternative Choice Odor Discrimination Task. Journal of Neurophysiology, 104 (2). pp. 829-839. ISSN 0022-3077

URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20538778
DOI: 10.1152/jn.00166.2010

Abstract

Kay LM, Beshel J. A beta oscillation network in the rat olfactory system during a 2-alternative choice odor discrimination task. J Neurophysiol 104: 829-839, 2010. First published June 10, 2010; doi:10.1152/jn.00166.2010. We previously showed that in a two-alternative choice (2AC) task, olfactory bulb (OB) gamma oscillations (similar to 70 Hz in rats) were enhanced during discrimination of structurally similar odorants (fine discrimination) versus discrimination of dissimilar odorants (coarse discrimination). In other studies (mostly employing go/no-go tasks) in multiple labs, beta oscillations (15-35 Hz) dominate the local field potential (LFP) signal in olfactory areas during odor sampling. Here we analyzed the beta frequency band power and pairwise coherence in the 2AC task. We show that in a task dominated by gamma in the OB, beta oscillations are also present in three interconnected olfactory areas (OB and anterior and posterior pyriform cortex). Only the beta band showed consistently elevated coherence during odor sniffing across all odor pairs, classes (alcohols and ketones), and discrimination types (fine and coarse), with stronger effects in first than in final criterion sessions (>70% correct). In the first sessions for fine discrimination odor pairs, beta power for incorrect trials was the same as that for correct trials for the other odor in the pair. This pattern was not repeated in coarse discrimination, in which beta power was elevated for correct relative to incorrect trials. This difference between fine and coarse odor discriminations may relate to different behavioral strategies for learning to differentiate similar versus dissimilar odors. Phase analysis showed that the OB led both pyriform areas in the beta frequency band during odor sniffing. We conclude that the beta band may be the means by which information is transmitted from the OB to higher order areas, even though task specifics modify dominance of one frequency band over another within the OB.

Item Type: Paper
Uncontrolled Keywords: LONG-TERM POTENTIATION GAMMA-OSCILLATIONS NEURONAL-ACTIVITY PIRIFORM CORTEX BULB BRAIN RECOGNITION INHIBITION MODULATION PLASTICITY
Subjects: organs, tissues, organelles, cell types and functions > organs types and functions > brain
organs, tissues, organelles, cell types and functions > cell types and functions > cell types > neurons
organs, tissues, organelles, cell types and functions > cell types and functions > cell types > neurons
organs, tissues, organelles, cell types and functions > cell types and functions > cell types > neurons

organism description > animal > mammal > rodent > rat
organism description > animal > mammal > rodent > rat
CSHL Authors:
Communities: CSHL Post Doctoral Fellows
CSHL labs > Zhong lab
Depositing User: CSHL Librarian
Date Deposited: 04 Oct 2011 14:09
Last Modified: 01 May 2013 20:21
PMCID: PMC2934938
Related URLs:
URI: http://repository.cshl.edu/id/eprint/15449

Actions (login required)

Administrator's edit/view item Administrator's edit/view item
CSHL HomeAbout CSHLResearchEducationNews & FeaturesCampus & Public EventsCareersGiving